Sunday, August 24, 2014

Episode #45 - Stephanie Zacharek (Having A Wild Weekend)

"I dont care how bad blockbusters get. You've gotta keep your finger on that pulse."

It often seems like writing for a large general audience and maintaining an idiosyncratic voice could be on polar opposite planes, but Village Voice critic Stephanize Zacharek has proven for many years they go hand-in-hand. In his final New York episode, Peter sits down with Stephanie to discuss her origins as a writer and learning from Pauline Kael, her entrance into the online world with Salon.Com and the challenges Internet criticism faces, as well as her interests in keeping up with contemporary film in each little aspect. Finally, the two dive into the Dave Clark Five movie, Having A Wild Weekend, and look at its success as a post-Beatles film that happens to critique its culture as much as celebrate.

0:00-3:10 Opening / Location Announcement
3:52-9:38 Establishing Shots - Chris Marker's Level Five
10:23-50:00 Deep Focus - Stephanie Zacharek
52:46-1:10:50 Double Exposure - Having A Wild Weekend (John Boorman)
1:10:54-1:12:33 Close
www.audibletrial.com/cinephiliacs
Read Stephanie Zacharek at The Village Voice, Movieline, and Salon.Com You can Follow Stephanie on Twitter here
Watch Having A Wild Weekend via Fox Archive on Amazon Instant.
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Sunday, August 10, 2014

Episode #44 - Gabe Klinger (The Bowery)

"Writing is a solitary activity, but programming is a social activity."

Critic, programmer, and teacher Gabe Klinger isn't interested in what we know about the movies—his journey has been fueled by searching beyond the even the outskirts of the canon to many of the far reaches of cinephilia, bringing those films to light by any means necessary. In his interview with Peter, Gabe discusses his origins as a cinephile in Barcelona, his work as a programmer at a young age in Chicago, and the current state of the world film festival environment. They also discuss two major accomplishments: his co-edited volume on filmmaker Joe Dante and Double Play, a documentary that follows directors Richard Linklater and James Benning, finding the uncommon links between them. Finally, the two examine The Bowery, Raoul Walsh's pre-code historical comedy, and the unique similarities it shares between a 1900 actuality called Namo Village, which was shot in Indochina. 

0:00-1:47 Opening 
2:57-8:27 Establishing Shots - The Lovers on The Bridge
9:12-1:07:20 Deep Focus - Gabe Klinger
1:10:06-1:29:11 Double Exposure - The Bowery (Raoul Walsh) with Namo Village (Gabriel Veyre)
1:29:15-1:30:53 Close
www.audibletrial.com/cinephiliacs
Watch Double Play on iTunes on YouTube.
Read Gabe Klinger on Cinema Scope, Mubi Notebook, and Senses of Cinema. Purchase his co-edited volume on Joe Dante. You can Follow Gabe on Twitter here
Watch The Bowery and Namo Village, both on YouTube.
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Sunday, July 27, 2014

Episode #43 - Dave Kehr (The Whistler)

Photo Credit: Ray Pride
"The real benefit of auteurism was taking the pressure off this endless search for stand alone masterpieces...there was an entire range of cinema not being addressed."

There are those who search out the most majestic works of cinema, and those who would rather search under the cracks for oddities and beyond. Dave Kehr, the former critic of the Chicago Reader and New York Times, and now a programmer at the Museum of Modern Art, certainly fits the latter bill. In his brief conversation with Peter, Dave talks about his origins as a cinephile in Chicago, the challenges of keeping the archive alive in the face of the digital programming switchover, and his recent series at MoMA—Lady in the Dark—dedicated to various crime films made at Columbia Pictures from the 30s to the 50s. Finally, the two investigate one series in particular, The Whistler starring Richard Dix, which features the former silent actor in terrifying and fatalistic situations, only to be reincarnated again and again.

0:00-1:27 Opening 
2:49-8:12 Establishing Shots - Boyhood and Dazed and Confused
8:55-48:47 Deep Focus - Dave Kehr
51:07-1:01:15 Double Exposure - The Whistler Series (William Castle, Lew Landers, and George Sherman)
1:01:18-1:04:04 Close / Outtake
www.audibletrial.com/cinephiliacs
Read Dave Kehr on his website and check out his NYTimes Column. Purchase When Movies Mattered here. You can Follow Dave on Twitter here
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Sunday, July 13, 2014

Episode #42 - J. Hoberman (Poor Little Rich Girl)

"I was encouraged to be as opinionated and obscure as I wanted."

While his origins as a cinephile are based largely in his interest in the avant-garde, J. Hoberman has become one of the most influential critics through his examinations of Hollywood blockbusters, world cinema, the outer limits of experimental works, and most importantly, film history. In his appearance on the podcast, Hoberman talks to Peter about his adventures as a kid traversing New York City's film culture, his movement through the the city's underground scene, and eventually to his position at The Village Voice and creating a voice that often examined the relationship between politics and cinema. Finally, the two discuss Poor Little Rich Girl, Andy Warhol's out-of-focus and out of this world portraiture of Edie Sedgwick, which Hoberman describes as a work of "pure cinema."

0:00-1:38 Opening 
2:03-10:18 Establishing Shots - 2 Years of Cinephiliacs / Donations and Reviews
11:02-1:09:29 Deep Focus - J. Hoberman
1:12:19-1:28:52 Double Exposure - Poor Little Rich Girl (Andy Warhol)
1:28:57-1:31:32 Close / Outtake
www.audibletrial.com/cinephiliacs
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Sunday, June 29, 2014

Episode #41 - Adam Nayman (All Is Forgiven)

"I try and keep my notes of doubt and discord when trying to build my response."

In a continent dominated by American cinema, it can be easy to forget how essential Toronto is for cinephilia: home of the famed film festival, base of the idiosyncratic magazine Cinema Scope, and the city where critic Adam Nayman has been writing and teaching. Nayman's latest writing opus is It Doesn't Suck, a fantastic book tracing the evolution of Paul Verhoeven's Showgirls from bomb to camp to cult to classic. Peter sits down with Adam to discuss the book, as well as his work for publications like Scope and Reverse Shot, his view of Canadian cinema, and much more. Finally, the two examine the first film from Mia Hansen-Love, All Is Forgiven, and how a film with seemingly little ambition can contain a great depth of feeling. 

0:00-1:17 Opening 
2:13-7:40 Establishing Shots - Blind Detective / Donations and Reviews
8:25-59:00 Deep Focus - Adam Nayman
59:44-1:09:09 It Doesn't Suck
1:21:24-1:41:35 Double Exposure - All Is Forgiven (Mia Hansen-Love)
1:41:42-1:43:32 Close / Outtake
www.audibletrial.com/cinephiliacs
Read Adam Nayman at Cinema-Scope, The Globe and The Mail, and Reverse Shot.
Buy It Doesn't Suck.
Follow Adam on Twitter.
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Sunday, June 15, 2014

Episode #40 - Michael Koresky (The Seventh Victim)

"We decided there should a publication for a younger generation of film writers."


It would probably take days to count the number of film publications that launched in the early years of the current millennium, but Reverse Shot, which Michael Koresky co-founded, has been a cornerstone of intelligent and dynamic film writing for over a decade now. Peter sits down with Michael to chart out the publication's origins, the voice the site created, Michael's own work with the Criterion Collection, and his upcoming book on British director Terrence Davies. Finally, the two examine the nothing-else-like-it horror film, The Seventh Victim, a Val Lewton produced existential drama that manages to bring chills down both their spines with one little phrase: "death is good."

0:00-1:36 Opening 
2:24-8:40 Establishing Shots - BAMCinemafest (Ellie Lumme and Something, Anything)
9:25-54:02 Deep Focus - Michael Koresky
56:48-1:11:49 Double Exposure - The Seventh Victim (Mark Robson)
1:11:53-1:13:32 Close
www.audibletrial.com/cinephiliacs
Read Michael Koresky at Reverse Shot and at The Criterion Collection. Pre-Order his book on Terence Davies.
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