Sunday, January 25, 2015

Episode #52 - Matías Piñeiro (Duelle)

"It's all these things of when you are trying to dialogue with the reality of the shooting. Everything gets mixed into the shot that it is."

When cinephiles think of international cinema today, there's a good chance they conjur up images of peasants walking through nature for an uninterrupted 10 (or 20!) minutes while trees rustle in the wind. The films of Argentinian director Matías Piñeiro couldn't be further from that image, and are also an absolute delight: beautiful young adults mixed in love triangles through Buenos Aires, reciting history and Shakespeare all while constantly changing their identities (and all under 75 minutes!). His films—The Stolen Man, They All Life, Rosalinda, Viola, and now The Princess of France—represent some of the most exciting and unique contemporary filmmaking today. So Peter sat Matías down to investigate his upbringing in Bueno Aires, his adaptation process when working with great texts of literature, and how he integrates realism into his work to find fantastical elements. Finally, they discuss Jacques Rivette's B-movie homage, Duelle, a masterclass of documentary and the magical, and a film with a surprising connection to Argentina's cinematic history.

0:00-2:49 Opening
4:02-9:34 Establishing Shots - Michael Mann's Blackhat
10:18-1:13:23 Deep Focus - Matías Piñeiro
1:14:25-1:15:48 Mubi Sponsorship - Over A Small Mountain
1:16:58-1:36:32 Double Exposure - Duelle (Jacques Rivette)
1:36:35-1:38:27 Close  / Outtakes
The Stolen Man is currently on YouTube. Viola is available for streaming on iTunes and YouTube, as well as Blu-Ray via Cinema Guild. They All Lie and Rosalinda are currently unavailable in the United States. The Princess of France will be released by Cinema Guild later this year.
Duelle is currently unavailable for purchase in the United States. There is a French DVD with its companion film, Noroit
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Thursday, January 8, 2015

2014 Favorites With Keith Uhlich (Part 2)

"Those lacking in imagination take refuge in reality." So speaks the first line to one of the ten eleven films that appear on Part 2 of Peter Labuza and Keith Uhlich's countdown of the best films of 2014. And what better describes their choices than fantastical images—prehistoric beasts, dogs (talking and non-talking), magical lands, and even more magical loves—bringing us closer to truth. From the snowy peaks of Zubrowka, the peaceful beaches off the coast of France, and inside a female uterus, Keith and Peter search for films that transform the way they see the world. The truth can be tough to swallow ("Well that's depressing," as one character might say), but these films make seeing it all the better.


0:00-6:51 Opening / Voicemails
6:52-21:54 Picks for #5
21:55-43:16 Picks for #4
43:17-1:01:45 Picks for #3
1:02:44-1:04:12 Mubi Sponsorship - Melancholia
1:04:13-1:30:33 Picks for #2
1:30:34-1:52:51 Picks for #1
1:52:52-1:56:02 Close / Outtakes
Read Keith Uhlich at The AV Club, L Magazine, and To Be Cont'd.
Follow Keith on Twitter.
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Sunday, January 4, 2015

2014 Favorites With Keith Uhlich (Part 1)

Another year, another cinema count down. Despite 2,500 miles between their locations, Peter couldn't resist sitting down Keith Uhlich—now of The AV Club, The L Magazine, and To Be (Cont'd)—to discuss their favorites of the year, so through the power of technology, the virtual balcony is open for this first of two parts. This year's freewheeling discussion takes us from the lore of Macedonia then up cabal cars to the gods of Nepal, the mundane moments of youth to the dystopic futures of simulacra takeover. And yes, even perhaps the realm of television might be crossed, but not without first fueling up on some cocaine from the good doctor. Plus, our favorite repertory picks of the year.

0:00-4:18 Opening Thoughts
4:19-22:34 Picks for #10
22:35-47:47 Picks for #9
47:48-1:04:41 Picks for #8
1:05:28-1:07:02 Mubi Sponsorship - Bluebeard and The Sleeping Beauty
1:08:05-1:24:18 Picks for #7
1:24:19-1:41:39 Picks for #6
1:41:40-1:56:10 Favorite Repertory Picks
1:56:13-1:58:26 Close / Outtakes
Read Keith Uhlich at The AV Club, L Magazine, and To Be Cont'd.
Follow Keith on Twitter.
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Sunday, December 21, 2014

Episode #51 - Tina Hassannia (You've Got Mail)

"Movies are always more than just the sum of their parts...no cinephilia should be limited to that kind of experience."

Up beyond the American border, Toronto based critic Tina Hassianna has formed a necessary voice that manages to combine a formal analysis of great works of American and world cinema with one concerned of how they socially operate. That made her a perfect candidate to write the first English language book examining the work of Iranian director Asgahr Farhadi, which has just been released. For her podcast with Peter, Tina talks about her late entry into the world of film, her interest in oddball works like Gus Van Sant's remake of Psycho, and her many thoughts on the cinema of her home country of Iran and what issues are at stake when Western critics analyze these works. Finally, the two turn back to Nora Ephron's You've Got Mail, which Tina and Peter look at as more than just a 90s romantic comedy, but a formally humorous remake that intelligently analyzes how online personas construct truer selves.

0:00-2:20 Opening
3:34-8:49 Establishing Shots - Clint Eastwood's American Sniper
9:135-57:34 Deep Focus - Tina Hassania
58:29-1:00:43 Mubi Sponsorship - You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet!
1:02:09-1:24:04 Double Exposure - You've Got Mail (Nora Ephron)
1:24:08-1:26:07 Close  / Outtakes
Read Tina Hassania's Asgahr Farhadi: Life and Cinema (or read an excerpt). Read Tina on Slant Magazine and Spectrum Culture
Listen to her podcast on Iranian Film, Hello Cinema.
You've Got Mail is currently streaming on iTunes and YouTube.
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Sunday, December 7, 2014

Episode #50 - Mike D'Angelo (Buffao '66)

"I've always been interested in as much in the prose as the actual ideas."

Before film criticism and cinephilia moved from print and theaters to the screen and discussion boards, Mike D'Angelo was already there forming its basis for a serious minded engagement with movies. Mike sits down for this 50th episode of The Cinephiliacs to discuss his original path as a screenwriter and an actor, how he moved from an online phenomenon to a full time film critic, and the way the Internet helped in shaping his uniquely crafted voice. Peter also talks with Mike on his walk out policy, his obsession with puzzlebox movies, and the importance of rhythm in cinema. Finally, they look at one of the strangest American indies of recent memory—Vincent Gallo's Buffalo '66—and how the director-star constantly surprises by both engaging and then breaking with indie conventions.

0:00-2:29 Opening
3:53-8:32 Establishing Shots - Robert Greene's Actress
9:18-1:07:04 Deep Focus - Mike D'Angelo
1:07:54-1:09:36 Mubi Sponsorship - Edvard Munch
1:10:53-1:31:03 Double Exposure - Buffalo '66 (Vincent Gallo)
1:31:08-1:33:28 Close  / Outtakes
Read Mike D'Angelo on his website, The Man Who Viewed Too Much, and on Letterboxd.
Buffalo '66 is available for rental on Amazon and iTunes.
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Sunday, November 23, 2014

Episode #49 - Kim Morgan (Something WIld)

"We're all human beings and these are artists—should they be doing the appropriate things all the time? That's not going to make great art."

Kim Morgan talks straight. There's a directness in what she describes—about the way actors move, about what directors do with the camera, about sex, about gender, about everything. So in her interview with Peter, the blogger, critic, and programmer talks about her first love of movies through Raoul Walsh's High Sierra, her take on the strange sunny world that is Los Angeles, and her programming for the Telluride Film Festival alongside filmmaker Guy Maddin. The conversation also covers many of Kim's great movie loves: Irreversible, the tough worlds of Von Trier and Polanski, the delightful one of Pre-Codes, and especially Marilyn Monroe. Finally, the two sit down with Jack Garfien's Something Wild, a radical independent film starring Carroll Baker and Ralph Meeker that tackles the subject of rape trauma through a mix of hard hitting realism and psychological surrealism.

0:00-1:48 Opening
2:50-7:49 Establishing Shots - Lav Diaz's From What Is Before
8:33-55:14 Deep Focus - Kim Morgan
56:01-57:35 Mubi Sponsorship - Camille Claudel, 1915
59:33-1:15:41 Double Exposure - Something Wild (Jack Garfien)
1:15:44-1:17:23 Close 
Read Kim Morgan's blog, Sunset Gun.
Something Wild is streaming for Amazon Prime members and on DVD via Warner Archive.
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