Sunday, August 24, 2014

Episode #45 - Stephanie Zacharek (Having A Wild Weekend)

"I dont care how bad blockbusters get. You've gotta keep your finger on that pulse."

It often seems like writing for a large general audience and maintaining an idiosyncratic voice could be on polar opposite planes, but Village Voice critic Stephanize Zacharek has proven for many years they go hand-in-hand. In his final New York episode, Peter sits down with Stephanie to discuss her origins as a writer and learning from Pauline Kael, her entrance into the online world with Salon.Com and the challenges Internet criticism faces, as well as her interests in keeping up with contemporary film in each little aspect. Finally, the two dive into the Dave Clark Five movie, Having A Wild Weekend, and look at its success as a post-Beatles film that happens to critique its culture as much as celebrate.

0:00-3:10 Opening / Location Announcement
3:52-9:38 Establishing Shots - Chris Marker's Level Five
10:23-50:00 Deep Focus - Stephanie Zacharek
52:46-1:10:50 Double Exposure - Having A Wild Weekend (John Boorman)
1:10:54-1:12:33 Close
Read Stephanie Zacharek at The Village Voice, Movieline, and Salon.Com You can Follow Stephanie on Twitter here
Watch Having A Wild Weekend via Fox Archive on Amazon Instant.
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Sunday, August 10, 2014

Episode #44 - Gabe Klinger (The Bowery)

"Writing is a solitary activity, but programming is a social activity."

Critic, programmer, and teacher Gabe Klinger isn't interested in what we know about the movies—his journey has been fueled by searching beyond the even the outskirts of the canon to many of the far reaches of cinephilia, bringing those films to light by any means necessary. In his interview with Peter, Gabe discusses his origins as a cinephile in Barcelona, his work as a programmer at a young age in Chicago, and the current state of the world film festival environment. They also discuss two major accomplishments: his co-edited volume on filmmaker Joe Dante and Double Play, a documentary that follows directors Richard Linklater and James Benning, finding the uncommon links between them. Finally, the two examine The Bowery, Raoul Walsh's pre-code historical comedy, and the unique similarities it shares between a 1900 actuality called Namo Village, which was shot in Indochina. 

0:00-1:47 Opening 
2:57-8:27 Establishing Shots - The Lovers on The Bridge
9:12-1:07:20 Deep Focus - Gabe Klinger
1:10:06-1:29:11 Double Exposure - The Bowery (Raoul Walsh) with Namo Village (Gabriel Veyre)
1:29:15-1:30:53 Close
Watch Double Play on iTunes on YouTube.
Read Gabe Klinger on Cinema Scope, Mubi Notebook, and Senses of Cinema. Purchase his co-edited volume on Joe Dante. You can Follow Gabe on Twitter here
Watch The Bowery and Namo Village, both on YouTube.
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